The Elephants’ Child by M L Eaton

FREE BOOK ALERT

At times sad and poignant but always enthralling and exhilarating, this is a story that captures the wonders of India as seen through the eyes and imagination of a young English girl.
It is 1954 and Melanie is six years old. With her parents, she moves to Bombay, (now Mumbai) India, where her father has been posted to undertake a Civil Engineering project, but, anxious and unsettled, she finds it difficult to make friends.
Entranced by the emotive beauty of her surroundings, she unexpectedly discovers the love and friendship that banish her loneliness.

FIVE STARS
Having read this novella in one sitting as it was, quite literally, ‘unputdownable’; I would love to recommend it most highly to other readers. The prose is almost poetic, if that observation is allowed in technical English language terms! It is strongly evocative of the sounds, smells and culture of the Indian sub continent in the dying days of the British influence. Sad in parts, ultimately it was a most uplifting story of a child’s awakening to the world outside her sheltered existence. Elephants, don’t we all have an affinity with them? They seem to have the best of human traits and none of the worst! The child’s understanding of, identification with, love for and enjoyment of the elephants, particularly her ‘special’ one, tugged at my heartstrings. This little book will remain with me for a long time, read it yourself, soon, and let me know what you think. – J Lindley : Amazon Reviewer
FIVE STARS
Having read this novella in one sitting as it was, quite literally, ‘unputdownable’; I would love to recommend it most highly to other readers. The prose is almost poetic, if that observation is allowed in technical English language terms! It is strongly evocative of the sounds, smells and culture of the Indian sub continent in the dying days of the British influence. Sad in parts, ultimately it was a most uplifting story of a child’s awakening to the world outside her sheltered existence. Elephants, don’t we all have an affinity with them? They seem to have the best of human traits and none of the worst! The child’s understanding of, identification with, love for and enjoyment of the elephants, particularly her ‘special’ one, tugged at my heartstrings. This little book will remain with me for a long time, read it yourself, soon, and let me know what you think.

A LOVELY READ FOR PEOPLE OF ALL AGES
This is a delightful book and a joy to read. It gives a sense of Pakistan and India in the 1950s which is immediate, describing it through the perceptions of a young child. This is not a rose-coloured spectacles memoir; each of the main characters has his or her own cause for anxiety. This gives a depth to them and encourages us to empathise with them. It was not an easy time, politically or culturally. There is joy in this book too and such a vivid sense of time and place, that it is easy to feel you are there with the sights and smells and sounds. Young children often have an affinity with animals, but the young Melanie’s connection with the elephants is extraordinary. I love this book. – J Coote: Amazon Reviewer


DO YOU LIKE READING BOOKS & WINNING GIVEAWAYS?

x